The Beginning of New Street Politics: 15,000 gather for Koenji Rally against Nuclear Power Plants

(Japanese translation below)

The Beginning of New Street Politics:
15,000 gather for Koenji Rally against Nuclear Power Plants

Yoshitaka Mouri

When I first heard the plan for the rally on April 10th in Koenji, Tokyo against nuclear power plants, I was certain that it would gather a lot of people, as most of my friends, including even those who had never joined in this kind of political demonstration march, expressed their willingness to participate in this occasion.
Since the March 11th earthquake, everyone has been anxious and frustrated, and many angry with the everlasting nuclear plant crisis in Fukushima, while the government and TEPCO continued only to state that the level of radioactivity was still of low to harm the environment, though the situation was evidently getting worse.

On the Internet, there were thousands of anti-nuclear plant discussions, but not so much space for them in the real world, let alone in the mainstream media such as television broadcasting and national newspapers. To most, everyday life became more and more stressful under the current conditions of media self-restraint. I believed that the rally would be a great opportunity to meet each other and to express our opinions.
As soon as I arrived at JR Koenji station at 2 o’clock, one hour earlier to start the march, on the day, I realized that the rally was much larger and much more enthusiastic than I had expected. I could not even enter the meeting and starting point, Koenji Central Park, as it was already packed full with people.
There were indeed a variety of people; hippy-styled old men, men dressed in animal costumes, Cos-Play girls, hip-hop B-boys, Rastafarian-like boys and girls, punk rockers, kimono girls, families with children and expecting mothers, baby-holding-fathers, high school kids and of course, anarchists and political activists. This diversity reflected the character of Koenji: a unique town where many bars, restaurants, live houses, record and CD shops, bookshops and second hand fashion boutiques attract young people. It has noisy but warm and cheerful atmosphere where anyone could enjoy themself.
The march started at 3 o’clock. Because unexpectedly many people turned up, the police forced them to be divided into about ten groups and made the rally very long (Unlike street demonstrations in Europe and in the US, rally participants are normally forced to pass strictly through a narrow street lane). They walked whilst dancing, singing, shouting, chatting with each other, eating and drinking in the streets, following sounds systems and musicians that played punk rock, techno, hip hop, reggae, drumming and Japanese traditional music. It took more than three hours for the last group to end their walk at Koenji station north exit park, but all of them enjoyed fully this street-party-like demonstration march.
It turned out that about 15,000 people participated in the 10th April Koenji action: the number was amazingly large considering that it was organized by small local recycle shops, Shiroto no Ran (Amateur Riot) and their friends. They have organized several street demonstrations in their own unique ways over the last five years, but the number of the participants has been limited to up to 500. The rally on April 10th was far more successful than they had expected. An organizer, Matsumoto Hajime said to Kyodo News, “It’s epoch making that so many people gathered without being mobilized by a large organization. It’s becoming big power as we joined hands over the Internet.”
This is a historical moment for Japanese radical politics, in particular, in the sense that a lot of young people, who have often been seen as apolitical for a long time, began to be engaged in politics in their own way. It is also fascinating to see that they are inventing different ways of expressing themselves from designing flyers and banners, wearing dresses, dancing, to playing music, DJing and performance: they are trying to connect face to face communication and bodily experiences in the streets to cyberspace via the Internet.
It is a pity that most of Japanese mainstream media, in particular, television broadcasting, is still remaining ignorant to any anti-nuclear movements including this one, although web news, blogs and social network media are enthusiastically reporting it via the Internet.
Nobody knows what will happen in the future. We fear radiation, but cannot feel it. Strangely enough the everyday landscape is same as usual, at least, in Tokyo. Social anxiety becomes more prevalent everywhere as the situation of the Fukushima nuclear power plants is critical. This is a totally new politics we are experiencing.
However, the big success of the rally on April 10th could be only a hope for a change of politics in Japan for a moment. The street and body politics they are starting to organize is, to me, one of the most appropriate political responses to the crisis of nuclear power and the invisible fear of radiation.

———————————————————

あたらしい路上におけるポリティクスのはじまり:原子力発電所に対する高円寺の抗議行動に、一万五千人が集まる

毛利嘉孝

(翻訳:萩谷海)

4月10日に原子力発電所に反対する抗議行進が東京の高円寺で行われる、という計画をはじめて耳にした時、私の友人の多くを含め、これまで政治デモに参加した経験のない人や、こういう機会に参加して意思表示をしたことのなかった人も沢山人が集まるだろうと、私は確信した。

3月11日の地震以来、すべての人々は不安といらだちの中にあった。そして、政府と東京電力が、状況は悪化しているにもかかわらず、放射線の放出量を環境に差し障りのない低いレベルであると言い続ける間、このいつ終わるとも知れない福島第一原発危機に怒りを覚えてきた。

インターネットでは、原子力発電所に反対する話し合いが行われていたが、テレビや国内の新聞などのマスメディアは言うにおよばず、現実の外の世界でそれを共有できる場は限られていた。しかも多くの人々にとって、メディアが言い立てる自粛によって、日常生活はより一層苦しいものとなった。そんな中でデモ行進は、他の人々と会って意見を交換し合うための絶好の機会になるだろうと私は信じていた。

当日、行進の始まる一時間前である二時にJR高円寺駅に着くなり、デモが私が期待していたより大規模で、熱意に満ちたものになるだろうと感じとれた。集合と行動の開始地点である高円寺中央公園はすでに人で混み合っており、私は公園の中へ入ることさえできなかった。

ヒッピー風情の年配の男性、動物の着ぐるみを着た者、コスプレ姿の女の子たち、ヒップホップやB系の男の子、ラスタ調の男女、パンクロッカー、着物を着た女性、子ども連れの家族や妊婦、赤ん坊を抱いた父親たち、高校生や、もちろんアナキストや政治運動家たちなど、ありとあらゆる人々が集まっていた。この多様性こそ、たくさんのバーやレストラン、ライブハウスや、レコード・CD屋、本屋、若者を魅了する古着屋などでひしめきあう風変わりな町、高円寺そのものといえる。騒がしくも、なんとなく暖かくて活気に満ちており、誰もが自分らしくあることのできる場という雰囲気だ。

行進は三時に始まった。というのも、予想以上の人数の多さに、警察がデモ参加者を10ほどのグループにわけ、長い列を作って行進するように強制、指導したことによる(ヨーロッパやアメリカでの路上デモと違って、通常日本におけるデモの参加者は厳しく囲われた狭い一車線上を歩かされる)。大型音響システムから流れるパンクロック、テクノ、ヒップホップ、レゲエ、太鼓や日本の伝統音楽にあわせて人々は踊り、歌い、叫び、おしゃべりを交わし、飲み食いしながら街を歩いた。最後尾のグループが目的地の高円寺駅北口公園までたどり着くのまで、3時間以上かかった。参加者は皆路上パーティーさながらのデモンストレーションを楽しんだ様子だ。

結果的に、この4月10日の行進への参加者は約1万5千人にまで達した。「素人の乱」のような、小さな界隈のリサイクル店などが組織したものとしては、この数字は驚くべきものだ。過去五年の間に「素人の乱」はいくつかの路上デモを決行してきたが、参加者は多くて500人程度だった。今回のデモ行進は、企画した彼らにとっても予想以上の成功だったのである。企画者の一人である松本哉さんは、共同通信に「大きな団体もなしにこれほどの人々が集まって行動を共にしたのは画期的。インターネットを通じて手を取り合えたことが大きな力になった。」とコメントした。

とりわけこの出来事は、長い間「非政治的」と思われて来た若者たちが、自分たちのやり方で政治と関わり始めたという意味で、日本のラジカルな政治行動においての歴史的な瞬間を生み出した。また彼らが、ビラや垂れ幕をデザインしたり、着飾ったり、踊ったり、楽器を演奏したり、DJやパフォーマンスなどの多様な表現方法を生み出したという意味でも目を見張るものがある。インターネットを通じたサイバースペースから路上においてまで、実際に顔をあわせた交流や身体経験を共有に挑んだのだ。

しかし、ウェブニュースやブログ、ソーシャルネットワーキングなどは精力的に報道している一方で、とくにテレビに代表される日本のマスメディアがこのような反核運動を無視し続けているのは残念なことだ。

これから何が起きるかは誰にも分からない。私たちは放射能を恐れているのに、それを明確に感じとることが出来ないのだ。東京においての日常の風景は、異様なほどに通常と同じである。福島の原子力発電所の状況がより深刻になるにつれ、社会的な不安が表面化している。私たちはが体験しているのは全く新しいポリティクスなのである。

しかし、現時点で4月10日のデモ行進の成功は、日本の政治の変化に見られる唯一の希望かもしない。こうして路上と身体の政治が組織されているという事実が、原子力の危機と目に見えない放射能への恐怖に対する、私にとって、一番まっとうな政治的応答のひとつなのだ。

About these ads

One response to “The Beginning of New Street Politics: 15,000 gather for Koenji Rally against Nuclear Power Plants

  1. Pingback: Meet the Voices of Radioactivists (3) « Radioactivists

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s