Tokyo2020、やばくないですか?

2020年東京オリンピックについて考え直す10の理由

English version here

チラシバージョン

確かにオリンピック・パラリンピックはいつだってスリル満点で、驚くべきパフォーマンスが見れるし、感動を与えてくれます。でもそれと同時にオリンピックには自然破壊がつきもので、大量のゴミを排出し、開催地に住んでいた住民は強制退去させられます(極端なジェントリフィケーション)。五輪施設の工事に関わっている人たちは過剰労働を強いられる一方、アスリートも搾取されています。性別は男女の二分化が強化され、耳障りなナショナリズムが高まり、高度な監視体制も導入され、さらに汚職問題も…。費用はどんどん増大してゆき、問題は増えるばかりです。

さらに今回の2020年東京五輪は今までにないある特徴があります。それは、日本政府が2011年3月11日に出した「原子力緊急事態宣言」が未だに解除されていない状況の中で開催されるという点です。では、なぜ日本政府はこんな状況の中で五輪開催のために莫大な予算をかけるのでしょうか?それは、「原発事故は過去の出来事で、日本は元気を取り戻し、再度活躍する準備が万端!」というメッセージを五輪開催を通して世界に向けアピールするためです。私たちはそんな都合のいい話に乗ってしまっていいのでしょうか?

2020年の東京五輪を考え直した方がいい10の理由を解説します: Continue reading Tokyo2020、やばくないですか?

Excerpts from Asahi Journalist AOKI Miki’s “Streets Erased from the Map: Post-3.11, the Prohibited Truth”

AOKI Miki (青木美希) is a journalist at the Asahi newspaper, one of Japan’s major news companies. Kodansha published her book, Streets Erased from the Map: Post-3.11, the Prohibited Truth(『地図から消される街ー3.11後の「言ってはいけない真実」』), in March 2018. It is the culmination of 7 years of continuous reporting on the 2011 TEPCO nuclear disaster. I have roughly translated and/or summarized some of the stories she documented in this book. (Where she refers to herself in the text, I have translated it as “I”; clarifying annotations/notes are mine).

CHAPTER 1: Local TEPCO Employees Who Can’t Raise Their Voices

Pages 28-39 (summarized):

Before the nuclear disaster, becoming a TEPCO employee was something many people aspired to. People used to say, “For a man to work at TEPCO means lifelong security; women should try to marry a TEPCO employee.” But after the disaster, they were resented. In the evacuation shelters, parents watched as their sons went back to work at Ichi-efu (1F = Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant). Before they left, they would write letters conveying their final farewells. I talked to a father who could not tell anyone at the shelter that his child worked at TEPCO.

I spoke to a young TEPCO worker. He was a local hire with a high school degree. He often went to TEPCO’s public relations museum as a kid, hoping he could one day become part of the future it displayed. When the earthquake happened, he wasn’t worried. The Meteorological Agency estimated that the tsunami height would be 3 meters, so he figured it would be about 1 meter, if it came at all. But as he was working in the reactor building, the power went out. Sea water started gushing in in the darkness. He ran up to the central control room, filled with monitors that would normally display live footage from various sectors of the power plant. But since there was no electricity, there was no information. He couldn’t get any of the pumps to move, since there was nothing to power them. So there was nothing to do but wait. That is where he was when the first hydrogen explosion happened. There were no windows in the control room, so he only heard it—an awful noise. The phones were still working, and he learned from a coworker that reactor 1 had exploded, and was thick with smoke.

About 2-3 hours after the explosion, an older employee said at least all the guys in their 20s and 30s should go to the quake-proof building, which is built with thick steel-enforced concrete [i.e., younger workers should evacuate there because the radiation levels are lower]. By then, more people had come in to work, and there were quite a few present who were in their 40s and 50s. So it was decided that all the younger men would evacuate—about 20 to 30 people total. They put on full face masks, light protective gear, and gloves to protect themselves from radioactive contamination, then ran together to the building, 350 meters away. The area was covered in debris, so they couldn’t use any of the cars onsite. They ended up running about 1 km to avoid getting too close to reactors 1 and 2.

Once they got there, he heard that two coworkers who had been sent to reactor 4 were missing. The building they had evacuated to still had power, so they could use the computers. But they still couldn’t do anything. All they could do was wait. They were still there during the explosion at reactor 3 on March 14th. Then the fuel rods in reactor 2 were damaged. The young TEPCO workers evacuated to a gym at the Daini nuclear power plant. They stayed there until the evening of March 16th, and then were told to go home.

After a week, the young worker was told to come back. His father didn’t say anything, but his mother told him not to go. But he told himself, “Who is there but us? This is happening in the town I grew up in. I need to keep the damage to a minimum.”

He did work like helping other workers out of their protective gear and handling the power switches for various machines at the entrance of a reactor building.

When he had been waiting in the quake-proof building, he had learned that two of his coworkers were missing. Someone started a rumor online that they were just enjoying themselves in Koriyama, drinking and joking about having pretended to be victims of the tsunami. Their bodies were found on March 30th, in one of the lower levels. The cause of death was shock from external bleeding from various injuries. Like him, they had been working in reactor 4 as ordered by their superior when the tsunami hit.

Things started to calm down in fall 2011, and he started to worry about the impact of the working conditions from that earlier period. His radiation exposure levels had not been recorded. He had been working without an APD (active personal dosimeter).

Note: It is industry standard for all workers to carry a personal dosimeter with them to record their external radiation exposure levels. According to a study summarized by the Radiation Work Network (Hibaku Rodo Network), the amount recorded can vary significantly even depending on where the dosimeter is kept on the body. It should also be noted that there are frequent reports of various workarounds to manipulate radiation exposure measurements. Though journalistic reports of the Japanese nuclear industry have suggested that conditions improved when records started being digitally displayed instead of being transcribed by hand, personal dosimeter measurements remain one of the things that are made flexible in a work-related pinch. Some workers who go to areas with high radiation levels are not issued APDs; sometimes a veteran worker might take both his and a subordinate’s APD with him to make that worker’s exposure levels seem lower or higher; etc. (In some cases, workers want their exposure levels to seem lower than they actually are to stay under the exposure limit so they can keep working).

At first, this was because nearly all the APDs were lost in the tsunami. Of the 5000 or so APDs that were onsite, only the 320 or so stored in the earthquake-proof building remained. At first, TEPCO said there would be enough to go around if only one representative from each work team used an APD. But even after huge amount of APDs were sent to 1F from other nuclear power plants, TEPCO kept up with this policy. So about 3000 people continued working without APDs.

Radiation levels varied significantly by location (0.03-0.04 millisieverts/hr in the central control room, versus 1 millisievert/hr+ close to the exhaust stacks where the hydrogen explosions had occurred). But the radiation levels for all members of a team were recorded as the same as that of the team leader.

Note: This account actually understates the extreme degree to which radiation levels can vary onsite. There are small hotspots with extremely high radiation levels, whose locations might change with conditions in the plant. One worker remembered being told to stay away from a particular corner. The radiation levels there were 600-some millisieverts/hour. He was shocked, and said, “600 millisieverts, not microsieverts?” To which he received the dry reply, “That’s right, millisieverts. In microsieverts, it would be 600,000 per hour.” The area was not cordoned or marked off in any way. This was a few years after the meltdown. (For reference, average radiation levels in Fukushima prior to the meltdown were 0.05~0.07 microsieverts/hr; the international standard for the general population’s annual exposure limit is 1 millisievert/year).

On March 31st, TEPCO was issued a warning by the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, and subsequently recommenced issuing one APD per person. After that, workers were told that the company would correct its records of their radiation exposure levels. They were asked for details about where they had worked during the first week. But they probably couldn’t do much to correct the numbers, since no one had measurements of the radiation levels in different areas of the site at that time.

The first time they were able to measure their internal radiation levels was in early summer. A bus drove a simplified whole body counter (WBC) to Iwaki city, and measurements were taken. But the data was not shared with the workers. They were told it could not be share with them because it was “personal information.”

After repeatedly asking for it, the young worker finally got his data. He found his internal exposure level had been recorded at 50 millisieverts (mSv). Combined with his external exposure of 30 mSv, he had been exposed to a total of 80 mSv. When he thought about the standards for occupational illness recognition, he became afraid. It’s 5 mSv for leukemia; 25 mSv for a malignant lymph tumor; 50 mSv for multiple myeloma; 100 mSv for stomach cancer or esophageal cancer… He wanted to get married down the road and have kids… What if he got cancer 20 years later?

Note: Radioactive particles cycle through the body at different speeds according to their chemical properties. For example, Cesium-137 and Cesium-134 generally remain in the body for about one month. Additionally, much of the radiation emitted during the early stages of a nuclear meltdown comes from radioactive isotopes with short half-lives. A WBC is unable to measure the amount of radiation that was emitted by particles that already cycled out of someone’s body, nor can it measure the amount of radiation that had been emitted by particles that have already ceased to emit radiation. Consequently, even the figure of 50 mSv is an underestimation of his total internal dose from the nuclear meltdown.

<<Rough translations start here>>

He asked to be transferred, but his superior refused, telling him, “You haven’t gotten to 100 mSv yet. I’ll let out people with high exposure levels first.”

He thought about quitting. His mother encouraged him as well. But, he thought to himself, the reality is that about half of the hires at TEPCO are local people. If we don’t go, who will? Not to mention, all of my neighbors, relatives, and classmates know that I work at TEPCO. If I quit, maybe they will reproach me, asking “Why did you quit?”

It wasn’t just this young worker who thought that way. Many people kept their mouths shut, tortured with worry. Running away was scary; continuing to work was scary.

Every time he left for work, he felt like there was no place for him to run. Some people became depressed a few weeks after the disaster. At first, people were working thinking, “What can you do,” but now that it was fall, he felt like he was becoming depressed…

The young TEPCO worker wondered to himself, as one member of a worksite that tasked itself with providing “the safe energy of the future,” why had things turned out like this for him?

The company created something this dangerous in their pursuit of profit. They ignored the opinions of experts. Why didn’t they implement measures so that even if a tsunami came, they could continue to cool the reactors using the emergency power generators?

There had been times when the president of TEPCO and senior directors came to the site.

“Thank you.”—That’s what they would say. Even though he heard them, he could not feel that he was being thanked for his labor. They were not saying, “I’m sorry that we caused you this hardship,” or “Hang in there.” They said it as though it was entirely someone else’s affair, and he felt the insurmountable distance between conditions on the ground and company headquarters in Tokyo.

Residents of Fukushima often said, “Move your headquarters to Naraha town (where the nuclear power plant is), don’t leave it in the top-class district of Shimbashi [in Tokyo].” Even as a TEPCO local hire, he could understand their feelings.

He feels that people view the circumstances of those like him who are at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant like, “This is where we are; what else is there to do?” But he wants others to know that it’s not that everyone is resting on their laurels. At the very least, he did all he could in the midst of that terror.

His dad said, “It’s the people on the ground that lose.” That’s exactly how it is.

The young TEPCO worker’s request to be transferred was granted after more than a year had passed. But, he was told it was for a “limited time,” and after a few years he was issued another appointment, and returned to Fukushima.

Pages 40-43:

The Reality That 26% of Men in Their 50s Are Without Work

People chose many paths in the life they lived with TEPCO. There were people who stayed at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and there were people who left, seeking a different path. But there are also people who can’t go forward, who can’t help being fixed to one spot. Men in their 50s, who have trouble finding new employment.

A man in in his 50s who had done electricity-related work at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was speaking at an evacuation center in Iwaki city, his face red: “I’m never going back to 1F (Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant).” There was an open one-cup sake can next to him. A man I spoke to in Saitama was also saying, “I didn’t know it was so dangerous.” He was also about 50 years old. But, if they left their jobs, there was no way they were going to find work.

Though not limited to TEPCO-related workers, Fukushima University conducted a survey of the residents of the municipalities of Futaba County, which surround the nuclear power plant, in February to March 2017. There were 10,081 respondents. 31%, the largest percentage, responded that they had “little hope” for their future work or lives. 19% responded that they had “absolutely no hope.” 26% of those in their 50s reported being without work.

Note: She says “TEPCO-related” because the nuclear industry is composed of multiple layers of subcontractors. Power companies contract work out to monolith “zenekon,” or general contractors, like Mitsubishi, Hitachi, Toshiba, and so on. These companies then parcel out jobs to a vast array of subcontractors, who then further distribute the work through their own networks. There have been reports of at most 7 or even 12 layers of subcontractors, though a local expert noted that it would probably be impossible for the lowest-level subcontracting company to break even if the reports of 7+ layers were true.

Many people who worked at the nuclear power plant lived in Naraha town, on the southern side of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

A man who was 48 years old at the time of the disaster, who ran a subcontracting company in Naraha town and worked as a site foreman, went to work in Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant right after the accident in March 2011.

The site was wrecked. It completely overturned his sense that nuclear power plants are safe.

He was called to Fukushima Daiichi again in April of that year, but after that he thought, “I don’t want to see that wrecked nuclear power plant anymore,” and went to Saitama prefecture, where his wife and children had evacuated.

In September 2015, Naraha town’s evacuation orders were lifted. Shortly thereafter, he returned to his hometown. He renovated his house, and, wanting his family to return, he left a cumulative dosimeter in the house to measure its radiation levels. After one year, it read 0.1 mSv. He explained to his wife, “The radiation levels aren’t that high. I know because I’ve worked at the nuclear power plant.”

“I don’t want to be close to the nuclear power plant.”

That was his wife’s reply.

While displaced, the man developed diabetes, and in May 2016, he was diagnosed with depression. Since, he has been seeing a psychotherapist.

When I heard his story in April 2017, he was 54 years old. With white hair and a tired face, he looked far older than his fifty years.

His eldest son and eldest daughter are both in their 20s and working. His wife and children already bought a house in Saitama. Before, he would drive two hours and forty minutes one way to be with his family in Saitama. But before he realized it, his visits became rare, and he said he could not remember the last time he went.

Their life over there must be better now…

He wanted to be with his family. He is lonely and sad. He started to drink. Whenever he has time, he drinks. When he drinks, he feels a little better. When he gets sober, he starts to feel sad again. So he drinks again. If he drinks, he gets sleepy. It’s more of a “win” to fall asleep drinking.

But even so, he has fitful sleep, and at the very least he wakes up twice during the night. It’s a cruel cycle.

About 2 months after the national government lifted Naraha town’s evacuation orders, the returnee rate was at the 4% mark. Even later, it did not rise much, and the town stopped publishing statistics with the 11.1% it recorded in March 2017. Instead, it now publishes “town resident percentages,” which include new residents such as new nuclear power plant workers and recovery construction workers.

In the last available statistics on returnees, published in March 2017, 65% were in their 60s or older, and 5% were minors.

In the former site foreman’s neighborhood, only elderly people in their 60s to 80s have returned. He is the youngest in his block. He said to me, “I don’t know what is going to happen at the nuclear power plant so I think I’m going to quit. I want to work a normal job and die normally. It’s not like I can find new work now – what should I do? Right now, we get 160,000 yen per month as compensation, but TEPCO is saying it will stop paying. Are they telling us to die?”

His son was a nuclear worker, too. Their pride in their work, their life with their families, and their health was broken… They don’t have the energy to get back on their feet anymore.

原発事故被害者支援策の、論理的根拠と正当性の欠如

宍戸俊則

英訳はこちら:No Legitimacy, No Principle in Japan’s Nuclear Victim Support Policy (in English)

福島県庁は「2017年3月で、区域外避難者に対する住宅支援を打ち切る」と2015年7月に宣言した。2016年2月7日現在、その政策を変えるつもりは全くない。

そして、同じ2017年3月までに、原発事故で避難地域に指定した区域の中で、「50mSv/y以上の外部被ばく線量になる」とされている「帰還困難区域」と名付けられた地域を除き、全ての避難地域指定を解除する。避難指定解除される地域の住民に対しては、1年分の賠償(1人120万円)を追加で支払うだけで、他の特別な防護措置や財政優遇を基本的に打ち切ると決めている。 Continue reading 原発事故被害者支援策の、論理的根拠と正当性の欠如

東京電力福島原子力発電所事故発生前後から現在までの、 福島県庁と開沼博氏達による被災者への対応

宍戸 俊則

0 自己紹介

筆者は、2011年7月31日まで約25年半の間、福島県の県立高等学校正規雇用教員とし働きました。最初の4年間は、福島第一原発がある双葉町にある県立双葉高校の教員でした。そこで、原発作業員の過酷な労働条件(例:1日の被曝限度を10分で超えるので、拘束時間は8時間なのに実労働時間は10分で、主に原発配管から漏れる水を雑巾で拭いて集めるのが作業)などの例も聞きました。原発作業員がガンなどで死亡した場合、労災は認められない代わりに、一時金としては異例なほど高額な現金を遺族に支給する例も多数見聞しました。

原発事故発生時は、事故原発から直線距離で53kmの自宅に妻と子ども二人で住み、同じく直線距離で60kmの県立高校の教員でした。 Continue reading 東京電力福島原子力発電所事故発生前後から現在までの、 福島県庁と開沼博氏達による被災者への対応

略奪行為の擁護論

ot-383

この記事の原文『In Defense of Looting』は2014年8月21日付 The New Inquiry に掲載されました。

略奪行為の擁護論

ウィリー・オスターワイル (Willie Osterweil)

 アメリカ史の大半において反白人至上主義の反対運動の中最も正当かつ効率的な策略は、略奪だった。

ミズーリ州ファーガソンで抗議を続ける人々の勢いが衰えを見せない中で、マイケル・ブラウンJr.が警官に殺されてからちょうど1週間を迎えようとしていた。その頃、ツイッターの一部やプロテスターに同調していた左派のメディアの大方は、略奪行為をする人々をきびしく批判し始めた。 Continue reading 略奪行為の擁護論

We Just Want to Have a Family – An Interview with former U.S. Sailors Jaime Plym and Maurice Enis

by TODOS SOMOS JAPON

Jaime Plym (right) and Maurice Enis (left) speak at FUKUSHIMA FALLOUT in Stony Point, NY. Photo courtesy of Sachiko Akama  | ニューヨークでのイベントFUKUSHIMA FALLOUTで話すジェイミー・プリムさん(右)とモーリス・エニスさん(左)写真:赤間幸子
(English transcript is below Japanese – scroll down to read: We Just Want to Have a Family – An Interview with former US Sailors Jaime Plym and Maurice Enis)

Continue reading We Just Want to Have a Family – An Interview with former U.S. Sailors Jaime Plym and Maurice Enis

Radiation Exposure is Unequal

By SHIRO YABU

(photo: Global2000 on flickr)
(Originally published in Japanese for Gendai Shiso 現代思想, July 2012 Issue)

 

Doesn’t Radiation Discriminate?

The Japanese Reggae musician, Rankin Taxi, has a song he has been singing for over twenty years: “You can’t see it, and you can’t smell it either.”

Radiation is strong

Radiation is powerful

It doesn’t discriminate

And you can’t beat it

Yes. Nobody can beat radiation. Nobody can escape its harms — so Rankin Taxi sings, and he is right. Continue reading Radiation Exposure is Unequal

Exchanging Thoughts Since 3.11 Great Eastern Earthquake & Tokyo Electric Power's Fukushima Nuclear Crisis

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