The Absurdity of the Atomic Age

(日本語による原文下部に掲載)

The Absurdity of the Atomic Age
Masatake Shinohara
(Translated by Adam Bronson)

In the essay “The Absurdity of the Nuclear Age,” published in the Asahi Shimbun in August 1982, Kojin Karatani declared that, since childhood, he had nurtured a sense that the human world would someday perish. Karatani pointed out the absurdity of the fact that humanity lived under the “nuclear equilibrium” maintained between the US and the Soviet Union. If the equilibrium is shaken just a little, the earth could be contaminated by radiation in an instant and become uninhabitable. Karatani’s point was: that humanity continues to exist under such condition is itself all too absurd.

Yet Karatani was by no means lamenting for this lived absurdity. He is saying that absurdity must first of all be recognized as a difficult-to-extinguish condition of humanity.

If the absurdity of the nuclear age is that humanity is marked by the possibility of nuclear war, then one might think that now, with the dissolution of the US-Soviet opposition and the ongoing efforts directed toward the elimination of nuclear weapons, this absurdity will be alleviated. However in contemporary Japanese society, a different kind of consciousness of absurdity is on the rise. It is the absurdity of nuclear energy.1 In other words, even after the Cold War, the absurdity connected to the nuclear, as difficult to alleviate as ever, continues to mark human existence. Or rather, it may be that the absurdity of nuclear energy has continued to exist on a different plane from that of “nuclear equilibrium.” (Of course, from the standpoint of the interrelatedness between the introduction of nuclear energy into Japan and America’s Cold War strategy, it could probably be said that the absurdity of nuclear weapons equilibrium and the absurdity of nuclear energy are linked)

Through the nuclear power plant accident, the truth of the peaceful use of the atom2 has been revealed. It ought to be said that the fact this machinery and equipment was built and run under the condition that its operations would be permitted only if accidents absolutely would not occur was, to the same extent as “nuclear equilibrium,” an absurd state of affairs. Nuclear power plants have as their condition the possibility of enormous accidents. Whether we are dealing with computers or air conditioners or anything else, things can break. Nuclear power plants are no different. But in the case of nuclear power plants, the catastrophe that can be triggered by their accidental collapse is all too horrific. Therefore, it came to be assumed that accidents could absolutely not occur.

Jinzaburo Takagi, in a text written in 1994: “Energy and Ecology,” stated it the following way. Whether or not a huge accident will occur is something no one can empirically say. Therefore, “As long as there remains uncertainty, the terror that our lives are potentially jeopardized will always hover around this use of energy.”

That the Fukushima nuclear plant was not safe was first proven by the accident that happened. If there had been no accident, then the myth of its safety would have probably remained unperturbed. That being said, the reality that our lives were potentially jeopardized would have remained, regardless of whether or not an accident occurred, as long as the nuclear plant existed. What constitutes the myth of safety comes into existence when one attempts to ignore or veil this reality.

If I think back over it carefully, the myth of safe nuclear power ought to have already been shaken. At the time of the Chernobyl accident, I was eleven, but even now I remember the shock I felt when I saw the newspaper headline. Given the terribleness of the accident, I wondered suspiciously why humans built such a dangerous thing in the first place. Despite the fact that a nuclear bomb was not used, why did a catastrophe of the same magnitude occur on the basis of an accident at a power plant? If similar accidents repeatedly occurred, wouldn’t the world come to be like “Fist of the North Star?” (a comic hugely popular among children at the time, set in a world in the aftermath of nuclear war) Though I directed these suspicions to adults, I felt frustrated when no one would answer them definitively. I recall that I was told the accident occurred because it was a dangerous country like that Soviet Union, and it would not occur in peaceful and prosperous Japan.

Much has been said about the possibility of nuclear war, but I think not so much about the potential for a nuclear plant accident. Nuclear plants, as much as nuclear equilibrium, have always been a threat to the human world inasmuch as it has been dogged by the possibility of nuclear accident. But the absurdity has never been discussed seriously and rather shrewdly veiled – even after the Chernobyl Accident.

Now in Japan the periodization of post-3/11 is dominantly used. It is true that the nuclear accident was totally different from any of the disasters we had experienced in the past, and in this sense, we have come to live in a new age. Yet the fact that we have accepted the dangerous mechanism of nuclear energy as a condition of existence and, furthermore, that we have not had a serious discussion about its danger is not itself new. Due to the accident, radioactive substances have in reality been dispersed, and the future of everyone, not least of all children, is being hijacked, but we have already been living this actuality in potentia.

3/11 is in the end only the bringing to light of the absurdity of what have become our conditions of life. In other words, the nuclear power accident is in itself by no means unprecedented. It is said that there have been accidents on the verge of becoming a catastrophe up until now, and we were always warned of the possibility of an accident. It would not even be an exaggeration to say that it was waiting to happen.

If there is anything we ought to do after 3/11, isn’t it, first of all, to rethink the question of what on earth the absurdity we have lived through is? The successive construction of nuclear power plants happened after the 1970s. I have heard that 1975 marks a drastic change in Japanese society, but perhaps it is possible to think of this drastic change and the increase of nuclear plants in a parallel relationship. Is it not possible to think of the absurdity called nuclear power worsening at the same time as the state of Japanese society also reached new depths of absurdity? If that is so, it may be that what we are experiencing now is the limit of the absurd.

PDF (English)

—————————

原発時代の不条理

篠原雅武

一九八二年八月の朝日新聞に掲載された「核時代の不条理」というエッセイで、柄谷行人は、人間世界はいつか滅びるという意識を、子供の頃からもっていたと述べている。米ソのあいだで維持されている「核の均衡」のもとで人類が生きていることの不条理を柄谷は指摘する。この均衡が少しでも揺らげば一瞬で地球は放射能により汚染され、誰もが住めない場所になる、こういったことを存在の条件として人類が生きていることがあまりにも不条理である、ということだ。
だが柄谷は、不条理を生きているということを、けっして嘆いているのではない。不条理が、人類にとって打ち消しがたい条件になっていることを、まずは認めなくてはならないといっているのだ。
核時代の不条理は、核戦争の可能性ゆえに人類に刻印された不条理であるとするならば、米ソ対立が解消され、核兵器の廃絶にむけた努力が行なわれつつあるいま、不条理は解決されていくと考えることもできるかもしれない。だが、現在の日本社会では、別の不条理の意識が高まりつつある。原発の不条理である。つまり、冷戦の時代以後になっても核にまつわる不条理は、依然として解決しがたい不条理として、人間の存在に刻印されている。というより、原発の不条理は、「核の均衡」とは別の水準において存在しつづけてきたといってもいいのかもしれない(もちろん、日本への原発の導入とアメリカの冷戦戦略との関係性ということからすれば、核の均衡の不条理と原発の不条理はつながっているといえるのだろう)。
原発事故により、核の平和的利用の内実があきらかとなった。絶対に事故が起こらないという条件においてのみ稼働が許される機械設備を建造し運転しつづけるということも、核の均衡と同じくらいに、不条理な事態であったというべきだろう。原発は巨大事故の可能性を条件としている。パソコンだろうとエアコンだろうと、なんであれ、ものは壊れうる。原発もそうだ。だが原発のばあい、その事故による崩壊が引き起こしうる大惨事があまりにも壮絶である。それゆえに、事故はぜったい起こりえないこととされてきた。
高木仁三郎は、一九九四年に書かれた文章(「エネルギーとエコロジー」)で、次のように述べていた。巨大事故が起こるかどうかは、誰も実証的にいうことができない。それゆえに、「そこに不確かさが残る以上、我々の生命が潜在的には脅かされているという恐怖が、このエネルギーの利用にはいつもついてまわっているのである」。
福島の原発が安全でなかったということは、事故が起こることではじめて立証された。事故がなければ、安全神話はいまだに揺らがなかっただろう。とはいえ、私たちの生命が潜在的に脅かされているという現実自体は、事故があろうとなかろうと、原発が存在しているかぎりにおいては解消されない。そういった現実を無視し、隠蔽しようとするところに、安全神話なるものが成り立っている。
よくよく思い返してみれば、原発の安全神話は、これまでにも、揺るがされていたはずだ。チェルノブイリの事故のとき、私は11才だったが、新聞の見出しを見たとき感じたショックをいまでもおぼえている。事故の凄まじさもさることながら、そもそもが、こんな危険なものをなにゆえに人間はつくったのかと、疑問に思った。戦争が起こって核爆弾が使われたのではないのに、なぜ、それと匹敵するような大惨事が、発電所の事故によって起こるのか。同じような事故が頻発すれば、当時子供の間で大人気だった「北斗の拳」(核戦争のあとの世界を舞台とする漫画作品)と同じような世界になってしまうのではないか。こういった疑問を大人に投げかけても、だれもしっかりと答えてくれず、もどかしく思った。事故はソ連のような危険な国家だから起こったのであって、平和で豊かな日本では起こらないといわれたように記憶している。
核戦争の可能性については多くのことが語られていたが、原発事故の潜在的可能性は、そうでもなかったように思う。核の均衡と同じく、原発も、巨大事故の可能性につきまとわれていたかぎりでは、つねに人間世界を脅かしていたはずである。だが、どういうわけかその不条理は大々的には論じられず、巧妙に隠蔽されていた。チェルノブイリの事故以後も、そうだったのではないか。
日本では、三・一一以後という時代区分が、用いられるようになっている。たしかに、とりわけ原発事故は、これまでに経験された震災とはまったく異質なものであり、そのかぎりでは新時代を私たちが生きるようになったということもできるかもしれない。だが、原発という危険な装置を存在の条件として受け入れ、しかもその危険性については真剣に議論をしなかったということ自体は、今に始まることではない。事故により、放射性物質は、現実に撒き散らされ、子供たちをはじめ人々の未来が奪われつつあるが、そのような現実性をすでに私たちは潜在的に生きていた。
三・一一は、あくまでも、私たちの生活の条件となってきた不条理がいったいどういうことであるかを白日のもとにさらしただけのことである。つまり、原発事故そのものはけっして新奇なことではない。これまでにも、大惨事寸前の事故はあったといわれているし、事故の可能性はずっと警告されてきた。それは、起こるべくして起こったといっても過言ではない。
三・一一以後、為すべきことがあるとしたら、それはまず、私たちが生きてきた不条理がいったいどういうものであったかを、考え直すことではないか。原発が続々と建造されたのは、1970年代以後である。1975年を境に日本社会は激変したと聞いたことがあるが、ひょっとしたら、その激変と原発の増加はパラレルの関係にあると考えることができるかもしれない。原発という不条理の亢進とともに、日本社会のあり方も同じく不条理の度を深めていったと考えることができないか。そうであるなら、今私たちが経験しているのは、不条理の極限であるということになろう。

PDF (日本語)

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s