Worries

(Original text in Japanese below)

Worries

Ayumi G.

Since 3/11, worries constantly haunt my body and I cannot let go of them. I read in a book that similar worries are often found as a common psychological response among hibakushas. “Maybe one day I will be struck by a disease, one day my children and then their children will be affected by radiation…” – such angst is shared among hibakushas from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as those who live close to nuclear power plants throughout the world.

Living in Osaka in the western Japan, I am worried about my friends in the eastern Japan whose lives are in present and imminent danger, about an unforeseeable development of the disaster at Fukushima Nuclear Plant, about continuously leaking and spreading radioactive substances, and about the fact that 50 some reactors throughout Japan could be struck by more earthquakes to come in the near future.

I am distressed by the choice of food to buy at supermarket. Fish might be no longer edible since radiation has been discharged into the sea. Milk carton worries me, since it doesn’t indicate what part of Japan the milk comes from. Then I look at soymilk, but the soybeans are from the US. Where in the US are they produced? How can I be certain that they aren’t from fields near nuclear power plants? Is there really safe food? Even if there is, it will be too expensive for me to afford.

I hear that the life in Tokyo is even tenser. Tap water is undrinkable; even for washing vegetables, you are hesitant to use it; even taking shower with it is uncomfortable. The government and TV insist that it’s safe, but who could believe them?

More or less, all are affected by the disease of anxiety.

But that is not all.

“Japanese history has entered a new phase, and once again we must look at things through the eyes of the victims of nuclear power, of the men and the women who have proved their courage through suffering.” These are the words by Kenzaburo Oe after 3.11.

I must stress here that Oe’s words describing the Japanese as “victims of nuclear power” are not suitable to describe the present Japan at all. At the end of last year, for instance, Japan made a decision to export nuclear power plant to Vietnam. Japan, an archipelago with high probability of earthquake, had recklessly built numerous nuclear plants, and it is we the Japanese who could/did not stop them. We are not just victims. We knew somewhere in our minds that one day this could happen.

A mother who brought her child to an anti-nuke protest, expressed the same thought through a microphone in front of the headquarter of the Kansai Electric Power in Osaka. At recent street protests, I often see more women, more mothers, and more people whom I don’t usually see on the street. I hope to see more actions of women, children, and all commoners, spreading wider and wider like ripples.

The word hibakusha should not be particularized to Japan, for hibakushas have been born everywhere on the globe, as a matter-of-fact. Depleted uranium munitions were used in the Iraqi War, which caused many to be exposed to radiation. So were the people in the surrounding areas of Chernobyl in Ukraine. In the neighboring Belarus, one every four individuals is said to have been affected by the diseases related to radiation. The fish, caught near the nuclear experiment sites across Russia, are exported to India, by way of which condensed radiation has reached bodies of the people there. There are too many examples vis-à-vis the US. By the use of nuclear substances, the state has destroyed autonomous livelihood of the Native Americans, has destroyed the bodies of low-income workers and sometimes even of their own soldiers, and it has sold countless nuclear products to the rest of the world. Even Fukushima reactors were made by the American company GE.

When we look at the long-term solution for the nuclear threat on the planetary level, how to change the US and all other pro-nuclear states will be the most crucial task.

Hibakushas exist globally, and there is no need to pity Japan alone. We still do not know what will come after Fukushima, but if we don’t stop the entire nuclear apparatuses, it won’t be too long before we see the second Fukushima, the third, the fourth…

04/04/2011

—————————————————————
「不安」
Ayumi.G
3月11日以降、つねに不安がこの身をとりまき、離れることがない。それはヒバクシャに共通する精神的状態であるとある本で読んだ。いつか、発病するのではないか、いつか自分の子どもや子孫に影響が出るのではないか…という不安は、広島・長崎の被爆者や世界各地の原発や核実験場付近に住む人たちに共通したものだという。西日本の大阪という街に住むわたしの不安とは、東日本に住む親しい人たちの身が現実に危険に犯されていること、そして福島原発が今後どのような状況になっていくのかということ、漏れ続けている放射性物質のこと、またこの国に50いくつもあるという原発のうちのどれかが、また近い将来起こるであろう地震によって再び放射能をまきちらすという確信に近い予想によるものだ。

スーパーで食料品を買おうとして、いろいろ思い悩む。魚はもう食べられないか、海に放射能が流出しているから…、牛乳を買おうとしても日本のどこの産地なのか書いてないから何となく不安になる。じゃあ代わりに豆乳を買おう、と思っても大豆の産地はアメリカである。アメリカのどこで採られた大豆から出来ているのか?その産地は原発や核実験場の近くではないという保証はない…。本当に安全な食品なんてあるのか?仮にあるとしても、それらはとても高価で私の月々の生活費じゃあ手が届かない。軽いパニックが日常を襲う。

東京は、よりピリピリした生活状況であるという。水道水は飲めないし、野菜を洗って料理をしようとしても、水道水で洗っていいものか、と躊躇するという。シャワーを浴びるのも何か気持ち悪い。政府やテレビは安全だと言い張るが、そんなの信用できない。

何かしら、程度の差はあれ多くの人たちが不安という病気に取り付かれている(一方で、まったく無関心な人たちも少なくはない)。

「日本の歴史は新たな局面に入った。再び(核の)犠牲者とのまなざしを浴びるということだ」。3.11後の大江健三郎の発言である。

しかし、「核の犠牲者」とだけでは片付けられない。昨年末、ベトナムへ原発を輸出することを決めていたこの国だ。地震多発の島に無謀なほど多くの原発を作り続けてきたこの国であり、それを止めることができなかったわたしたちだ。単なる犠牲者ではない。いつか、こうなることはわかっていた。

同じ様な気持ちを、ある母親は子どもを連れて参加した関西電力前での反原発行動中にマイクを握って吐露した。そうした普段は活動には縁がない、飛び入りの女性や母親たちをよく見かける。おんなたちの行動が波紋のように広がっていけばいい、そう願う。

ヒバクシャという言葉は日本に特化されるものではない。なぜなら分かりきったことだが世界中でヒバクシャは生まれているからだ。イラクに大量に落とされた劣化ウラン弾のせいで被曝した人たちが多くいる。チェルノブイリ事故の影響によりウクライナの周辺地帯はもちろんのこと、隣接するベラルーシでは国民の4分の1が何かしら被曝による病気をもつという。ロシアの核実験場近くの海で採れた魚はインドへ輸出され、濃縮された核物質がインドの人々の体内へと届くのだ。アメリカにおいては例を挙げるときりがない。先住民の自律的生活を破壊し、下層労働者の身体(ときには実験体として自国の兵士までも)を蝕み、世界中に核の商品を売り込んできた巨大な原子力産業を育んできたアメリカ、この国をどう変えるかが地球レベルでの長期的な視野においては最も重要な課題のひとつだと思われる。福島原発を製造したのもアメリカのGEだ。

核の犠牲者は世界中にいるのだから、特別日本に憐れみのまなざしを向ける必要などない。第二のFukushimaがどこになるのかそれは分からないが、原子力産業を止めることができなければ、その現出はそう遠い将来ではないはずだ。

2011/04/04

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s