Daily Archives: April 9, 2011

Dystopia of Civil Society

(Original text in Japanese below)

Chigaya Kinoshita

In his “A Response to Rebecca Solnit,” Yoshihiko Ikegami highly appreciates A Paradise Built in Hell, and at the same time argues that the principle of hope inherent in the disaster utopia might not work for the present situation in Japan, confronting as it is not only natural disaster by earthquake and tsunami but also nuclear disaster. As he points out, radiation exposure causes calamities not only on living humans but also future generations. And nuclear accident deprives us of the place/space itself where the utopia can come out of disaster. Unfortunately hopes for recovery drastically diminish here. In the worst case, parts of Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures will be no man’s land for an indefinite length of time. Possibility for a recovery of community is zero in such condition. Now it must be considered how one can talk about the disaster utopia in the present situation of Japan in relationship with the previous nuclear disasters in Ural 1950 and Chernobyl 1980. This is our task.

However, I think that the difficulty of building a disaster utopia in Japan is not simply due to the characteristics of nuclear disaster per se but something else. For instance, some foreign media have repeatedly praised diligence and order the Japanese people sustained in confrontation with the critical situation, but at the same time expressed a sense of oddity that there have been so little critical discourses and actions being observed there.

It is not that there have been no resistances, though being scarce. I shall name a few examples here. The resistance that has been most spoken about so far among the general public took place in professional baseball. After 3/11, the home stadium of the Eagles based in the northeast has been damaged and out of use. In response, the Pacific League to which the Eagles belong determined to postpone the season until April. But the Central League whose member teams are centered in Tokyo and Osaka areas insisted on the determined date of March 25th. The background to this insistence is problematically interesting. The one who was behind this coercion was Tsuneo Watanabe, the owner of Yomiuri Newspaper. Once an agent of CIA in the cold war age, Watanabe played a major role in introducing nuclear power plant in Japan during the 1950s. (I shall write a piece about the US/Japan strategy vis-à-vis the introduction of nuclear power.) The intension of Watanabe to start the season on the predetermined date was evidently to create an image of successful recovery by shifting the public attention from the on-going nuclear disaster to the baseball season. The teams of the Central League followed this decision.

Meanwhile the union of professional baseball players declared: “it is nothing but conceit to start a season in this situation,” and its intention to go on strike. Public opinion largely supported this, and finally the Central League was forced to delay the season. The union was able to express their voice under the state of emergency only because it had a previous experience of all team strike against amalgamation plan in 2004. This strike was a rare example that achieved a wide range of support from Japanese public who generally hold anti-strike sentiment. At that time as well, the main enemy of the players was Watanabe, and the axis of opposition has returned in the current dispute, with repeated success in establishing a commonsense with the public. Such was the motive drive for the radical response of the players.

Another example is the struggle of Ohta Kinoshita, the former news desk of Nippon Television Network. He was the one who reported the critical accident at Tokaimura Nuclear power Plant in 1999. At the wake of 3/11, he gave up his post at the TV station, and began a blog <http://twitter.com/KinositaKouta> to propagate the danger of nuclear energy. With his profound criticism of Japan’s mass media that is spreading ungrounded optimistic views, and resisting accusations against himself being escapist and traitor, he persists in his critical conviction by giving up his high salary job.

There are lineages of such oppositional spirit in Japan that are not familiar for foreign media, but they are unfortunately very rare.

At the wake of 3/11, the transportation system and infra-structure of Tokyo were plunged into chaos. All workers had difficulties in commutation. Foreign owned enterprises announced to their employees that they did not have to come in for work. It is said that foreign workers did not come following the reasonable recommendation, but alas! Japanese workers came to work by making tremendous effort to reach the metropolis.

There are more examples like this, say, of conformism. Fukushima University is in Fukushima City, located within 60 KM radius of the power plant, where radiation is detected well over the standard measure. The university dares to resume its courses in May. The president issued a declaration that sounded nothing but a self-enlightenment; the administration ignored the objection of some faculties and accused as traitors those who refuged outside the prefecture; to the students it vaguely suggested that they go home when the government issues the order of standing by at home. The resumption of courses in coming May will inexorably bind all students and all university workers. The administration has no concern about the lives and well being of the students and workers; it just seeks to carry out its everyday business, blindly obeying the order of the Ministry of Education.

While the disaster of the nuclear accident is getting worse and worse everyday, Japanese society is held tight by such conformism. Observing this, many of us immediately think of the total war mobilization during the Pacific War. They might associate Fukushima University with Kamikaze attack, or they might find it as derivative of the traditional characteristics of diligence and submission. Stereotypically this can be deemed the nature of nationalism of Japan-type.

However, it is my contention that the basis of the present conformism is not there. Foreign media have been reporting also about the insufficiency and incapacity of the Japanese government in terms of emergency measures and information disclosure. What is at stake here is a question of Japanese civil society that approves of such problematic governance. I think that the problem exists not in nationalism but the structure of the civil society. The present conformism must be analyzed from the vantage point of class struggle within Japanese society after the high economic growth of the 1960s, where the civil society has come to be dominated by capital, while its class nature has been made invisible within the civil society.

A clue to approach this issue is “the death by overwork [karoshi].” This internationally circulated term signified a serious social problem during the 1980s when Japan was celebrating the bubble economy. After having overcome a strong yen in the mid 80s, Japan’s economy began to enjoy prosperity since 1986. In consequence, the sense that Japanese are rich and the society is wealthy generally spread. On the other hand, however, also generalized was the image of the Japanese as working bees, based upon the fact that the workers work intensely for long hours. The incredibly speedy economic growth and karoshi both indicated an abnormality that derived from a same root. Here I would like to pay attention to the fact that the Japanese workers were not mobilized and driven by such external coercion as the state of total war. Workers would not likely work so hard and long as to reach karoshi by an external coercion. Karoshi became a wide social problem only because of the existing structure in which the workers voluntarily devoted themselves to their companies to the extreme.

I doubt that this structure is derivative of the tradition and convention inherent in Japanese society. At the end of the Pacific War, from the 1940s through the 60s, there was a powerful labor movement. Up until the mid 1970s, strikes and street actions were part of the everyday landscape. Thereafter, however, strikes drastically plunged and the industrial actions of labor unions fell to the bottom. Be it white-collar or blue-collar, as the workers lost their class-consciousness, they came to identify themselves dominantly with their companies. Despite the increase of working populations under the high economic growth, the rule of conservative LDP lasted for such a long time, because the working class supported it instead of the Japan socialist Party or the Japan Communist Party that tended to social democracy. In this manner, the myth of the Japanese being obedient and diligent got fixed only during these forty years.

A work-centrism grasped the entire society under the directive of capital; autonomy was totally lost in domains of everyday life and culture; the view of life was homogenized under the idea of company=citizenship, based upon the principle of competition among individuals. These broad senses of everyday life were created after the defeat of class struggle, which are the very disciplines that would not allow resistance, disobedience, and exodus at this moment.

Certainly the enduring recession that began in the 1990s and the abuses of neoliberal reforms leveled the economic basis for creating and sustaining the everyday senses of Japan’s civil society. At the moment, however, the collapse of economic basis have not yet triggered the willingness of the people to look for an alternative, but are rather spurring on the tendency to compete their submission even harder for survival. Now what is grounding Japan’s conformism is a delusive obsession: “if I am kicked out from my job, my everyday life, I won’t be able to come back.” On top of that, as people are confronting threats of radiation that is invisible and may produce long-term effects as opposed to immediate, this prolonged state of crisis is reinforcing the structure of Japan’s corporate-civil society.

I am aware that the actual difficulties of Japanese society cannot be reduced only to the problematic of class. Its nationalism should be shed light on in itself. There are many more moments to be scrutinized in relationship with Japan’s crisis: i.e., globalization, neoliberalism, disaster capitalism, empire and the US, correspondence or mirroring with the revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa, whereabouts of social movements, etc. What I wanted to clarify in this short piece were that the present crisis is rooted in the way of Japanese modernity; and that Japan is confronting a tremendous social and political shift that cannot be spoken of, without rethinking its past and present in their entirety. Now in spite of its superficial tranquility, Japanese society is about to be losing its coherence of past-present-future and torn apart into pieces.

————————————————————————————–

市民社会のディストピア
木下ちがや

このブログに掲載されている文章「レベッカ・ソルニットへの回答」のなかで、池上善彦は、「災害ユートピア」を高く評価しつつ、しかしながらそれが津波・地震という「自然災害」にとどまらず「原発事故」という事態に至ったことで日本社会の現状を十分に捉えることはできないと論じている。池上が述べるとおり、放射能被爆は、現に生きている人間のみならず、幾世代にもわたる災禍をもたらす。回復への希望はここにはない。また、原子力事故では「災害ユートピア」が生じるような場所・空間そのものが失われてしまう。最悪の場合、福島県や茨城県の一部は、長期間にわたり居住不可能になるだろう。コミュニティ再生の可能性はここではゼロである。1950年代ソビエトの「ウラルの惨劇」、1980年のチェルノブイリ事故において、「災害ユートピア」の希望を語りうるのかどうかこそが現状の日本と比較されるべきだろう。

しかしながら、現在の日本における災害ユートピアの困難は、必ずしも原子力災害がもたらす特徴だけに還元することはできないとも思われる。海外メディアのなかでは、現在の日本の危機的な状況における日本人の勤勉さ、秩序への賞賛が繰り返される一方、批判的言論や行動があまりにも少ないことへの不気味さも指摘されている。

もっとも、まったく「抵抗」がないわけではない。この間日本でもっとも話題になった抵抗はプロ野球である。3・11の地震と津波によって、東北地方の球団「イーグルス」の球場が被災し、使用困難になった。プロ野球パシフィック・リーグは早々に開催を4月に延期した。これに対して東京・大阪が中心のセントラル・リーグは予定通りの3月25日からの開催を強行しようとした。この強行の背景は興味深い。これを強く主張したのは読売新聞社主渡辺恒雄である。CIAのエージェントであった渡辺は、1950年代に日本が原子力発電を導入するにあたって重要な役割を果たした人物である(渡辺および1950年代の原子力の導入の米日の支配戦略については今後また論じたい)。渡辺が通常通りのプロ野球の開催にこだわった意図は、原子力問題から目を逸らさせ、ポジティブな復興というイメージづくりにプロ野球を利用することにあった。セリーグの各球団はこれに追随した。

これに対して、プロ野球労働組合は「現在のような状況でプロ野球を開催するのは思い上がりである」と強硬に主張し、ストライキに突入する構えをみせた。世論もこれを支持し、最終的にセントラルリーグは5月に開催を延期することを余儀なくされたのである。このように、プロ野球労働組合が現在の「非常事態下」でストライキを提起することが可能だったのは、2004年に球団の合併をめぐり全球団の労組がストライキに突入したという経験があったからである。このストライキは、ストライキ嫌いが強い最近の日本社会ではほぼ唯一世論から全面的な支持を得た。この時も最大の「敵」は渡辺恒雄であり、この敵対軸が再現されたこと、そしてそれが社会的なコモンセンスになったことがプロ野球労組の急進的な対応の原動力だった。

もうひとつ例をあげよう。日本テレビの報道局デスクの木下黄太(きのしたおうた)の闘いである。木下は、1999年の東海村の臨界事故を取材したジャーナリストである。彼は3・11の直後から職場放棄をし、個人的に原発の危険性を訴えるブログを発信している。<http://twitter.com/KinositaKouta>彼は楽観論を振りまく現在の主要メディアの姿勢に疑問をもち、「逃げた」「卑怯者」という非難を顧みず、高給の仕事を捨てて自分の信念を貫こうとしたのである。

こうした海外メディアが報じる「日本人像」とは異なる不服従の精神は、今の日本社会のなかでも脈々とある。しかしながらそれは、稀なのである。

3・11直後、東京の交通機関・インフラは大混乱に陥った。多くのサラリーマンは出社・帰宅が困難な状況に陥った。外資系企業の多くは出社をしなくてもいいという通達を社員に出していた。外国人社員はこれに従ったといわれるが、驚くべき事に多くの日本人社員は、普段の数倍の時間をかけて出社してきたのである。

こうした現象は3・11直後にとどまらない。福島市は福島第一原発から60キロ圏内にあり、すでに基準値を超える放射能が検出されている。ここにある国立大学福島大学はいま、5月はじめから授業開始するいう暴挙をやろうとしている。学長は自己啓発めいた声明を出し、大学執行部は一部の教員の異議申し立てを聞くどころか、県外に非難した教員を「非国民」扱いしている。そして学生に対しては、政府から自宅待機の命令が出た場合には、「自分の判断で大学から帰宅するように」という無責任な対応に終始しているのである。いうまでもなく、授業の開始は教員のみならず5000人の学生達の行動を縛り付けることになる。大学側は、学生の命や健康には関心はなく、文部省の指導に従い「日常業務」をせっせとこなそうとしているのだ。

原発事故の被害は日々一刻深刻になっているのに、日本社会はこのようなコンフォーミズムに掴まれている。これを目にしたものの多くは、ただちにアジア・太平洋戦争下の国家総動員体制を想起するだろう。福島大学を特攻隊になぞらえるだろう。あるいは日本人の「伝統的特質」としての勤勉さ、従順さを見いだすだろう。これらを一括りにして「日本型ナショナリズム」の特徴といえるだろうか。

しかしながら、現在のコンフォーミズムの根拠は実はここにはないのである。海外メディアでは日本政府の情報開示や対応についての甘さ、不充分さが批判されているが、こうした不充分さを容認する日本の市民社会とは何か、がここでは問われなければならない。問題はナショナリズムではなく、市民社会の構造に基因していると思われる。現在の日本のコンフォーミズムは、資本による市民社会の制覇、市民社会における階級性の圧殺という、高度成長以降の日本社会の階級闘争のあり方という視角から分析されなければならない。

この問題を考えるうえで鍵になるのは「過労死」である。いまや国際的に通用する用語になった「過労死」は、1980年代、バブル経済を謳歌する日本の社会問題であった。日本経済は、80年代中庸の円高不況を克服し、86年以来きわめて長期にわたる好況を続けた。その結果、日本人は金持ちであり、日本は「豊かな社会」であるという感覚が一般化した。しかしこのことと、労働者の長時間過密労働、「働き蜂」といわれた日本人像も同時に一般化した。このような、日本の急速な経済成長と「豊かな社会」化、そして過労死は同じ要因に根ざす「異常さ」だった。ここで問題になるのは、こうした日本の労働者は、総力戦体制のように外的強制による動員で働かされたわけではないということである。労働者は外的強制のもとでは過労死になるまで働くことはない。過労死が社会問題化するのは、労働者が層として企業のために外見的には自発的に忠誠を尽くす構造があるからである。

そしてこうした構造は、日本社会に伝統的・因習的にあるものではない。アジア・太平洋戦争終結後の1940年代後半から60年代にかけて、日本には強力な労働運動が存在した。70年代中庸まではストライキや街頭デモは「あたりまえ」の風景であった。ところが、1970年代を画期に、日本社会ではストライキは激減し、労働組合の産業行動力は地の底へと落ちていく。ホワイトカラー、ブルーカラーを問わず労働者階級のほとんどは階級意識を喪失し、「会社員」としてのアイデンティティが支配的になっていく。高度成長による労働者の増大にもかかわらず日本の保守政治の支配が長期的に存続したのは、労働者階級が日本社会党・日本共産党といった社会民主主義政党ではなく保守政治を支持するという傾向が強かったからである。このように日本人の「従順さ」「勤勉さ」という神話は、ここ40年足らずの時間のなかで定着していったのである。

資本の指揮のもとでの「労働中心主義」が社会をつかみ、生活・文化領域での自律性が失われたこと、「企業市民」としての諸個人間の競争原理にもとづく生活観の一元化がすすんだこと。このような階級闘争の敗北の末に生み出された現代日本の「日常感覚」が、いままさに、「抵抗」「不服従」「逃亡」を許さない規律をつくりだしている。日本の1990年代の長期不況とネオリベラル改革は、こうした日本型市民社会の日常感覚の経済的土台を掘り崩した。だが現状では、オルタナティブを目指すのではなく、経済的土台が掘り崩されたからこそ「生き残り」をかけて従順さを競い合うという傾向に拍車がかかっている。「いったん日常の仕事、生活から離脱したらもうもとには戻れない」という強迫観念が、今の日本のコンフォーミズムを支えているのである。また放射能が「見えない恐怖」であること、「直ちに」ではなく長期的ものであり「危機」が先延ばしされていく性格のものであること、これがこの企業市民社会の構造をむしろ強化する方向に機能していると、思われるのだ。

もちろん「階級」という問題に、今の日本社会の困難がすべて還元できるわけではない。ナショナリズムについては独自に検討しなければならいだろう。他にもグローバル化、ネオリベラリズム、災害資本主義、帝国と「アメリカ」、中東革命との連動性、社会運動等々、論じるべきことはあまりにも多くある。ただこの文章で示唆したかったのは、現在の危機が、日本の近代化のありかたに根ざしていること、そして過去に眼差しを向ける事抜きに、現在とこれからを決して語り得ないほど、大規模な政治的、社会的変動に直面していることだ。今の日本社会は表面的な静けさとは裏腹に、過去-現在-未来の調和を失い、引き裂かれようとしているのだ。