Dystopia of Civil Society — Part 2

(日本語による原文下部に掲載)

Dystopia of Civil Society — Part 2

Chigaya Kinoshita
(Trainslation by Max Black)

Silvia Federici and George Caffentzis’s “Must we Rebuilt their Anthill?” is very rich in suggestions, and includes indicators to Japan’s present and future as well as showing an important direction for the re-posing of the question of the relationship between Japanese capitalism and society. Until a little while ago I had planned to write a response to their suggestions. But at present, there is an urgent need to talk about the ugly aspects of Japanese civil society that are rapidly spreading before our eyes.

On April 16th, the Ministry of Education reestablished the yearly limit for radiation exposure for children at 20 millisieverts. The yearly limit up to this point had been one millisievert, and even the ‘Nuclear Safety Committee,’ a collection of academics working in the service of the government, had announced that 10 millisieverts was the highest that this limit should go. Nevertheless, the limit was raised by twenty times at once. In short, this aimed to get the schools in Fukushima Prefecture open on schedule as usual, and in fact, even in areas where Greenpeace surveys have found radiation levels that are not innocuous, children are going to school ‘like usual.’

A survey conducted recently by a citizen’s group found radioactive material, in trace amounts, in the breast milk of mothers not only in Fukushima but also Ibaraki and Chiba prefectures, far away from the reactor. (In response to this survey, the Vice-Governor of Tokyo, Naoki Inose, made the ugly remark that they should “not stir up excessive worry and the housewives should get back to work right now.”) The radioactive pollution of Fukushima prefecture is getting considerably worse each day and there is a crisis situation where the health of children who are the most sensitive to radioactive material is concerned. But in response the government and Fukushima Prefecture do nothing but preach safety and are not attempting to take concrete measures. At any rate, Yoshihiko Ikegami can argue this point on this blog. What I would like to take up here is the appearance of ‘an exterior,’ ugly civil society outside Fukushima prefecture.

Right now there are two reactions to the people of Fukushima Prefecture in the ‘exterior’ civil society that would initially appear to be completely opposed.

One is the ‘Let’s go, Fukushima!” reaction, specifically an organized campaign saying “Fukushima is suffering from reputation damage, let’s buy its vegetables and products.” It is very widely said that one should buy things, and eat things, from Fukushima.

The other reaction is a form of discrimination directed towards those who have been evacuated out of Fukushima. There is the beginning of harassment and bullying of students from Fukushima who have transferred to schools in other prefectures. Cars with license plates from Fukushima are being denied service at gas stations, and people from Fukushima are being denied lodging at hotels.

These two reactions initially look like complete opposites of each other in the sense that the former appears as ‘good intentions’ and the latter appears as ‘bad intentions.’ In reality the two complement each other and function as a quarantine by ‘containing’ the people of Fukushima inside the area exposed to radiation. And these two reactions are bound together through the discourse of ‘reputation damage.’

In this context, ‘reputation damage’ connotes that ‘even though it’s safe, rumors are being spread that it’s pretty dangerous, and as a result people in Fukushima are taking damage to their livelihood and business.’ Of course, the problem is with a nuclear reactor and the situation is dangerous. But this fact is of no real importance. When the danger level at the Fukushima reactor was raised to 7, a television commentator made the following statement: “With a level 7 nuclear accident, reputation is a concern.” This discourse, which we might as well call Kafkaesque absurdity, is unchecked in Japan today and is a matter of course.

That agricultural products and seafood from the area of Fukushima Prefecture are in danger is already a matter of course. Most agricultural products and small fish originating in Fukushima prefecture are already blocked from shipment. This also means that a danger is closing in on the people in Fukushima who live off of this basis in the soil, and use this water.

But, nevertheless, citizens outside of Fukushima might as well be saying this: “Let’s go, people of Fukushima! Don’t give in to reputation damage: we’ll buy your products!” while at the same time saying “this business of ‘danger, danger’ is a lie! Humans of Fukushima, calm down and (however bad it gets) live your lives with restraint, and work diligently.” However, in actuality, most citizens outside of Fukushima Prefecture are conscious that something dangerous is happening. In other words, a distinction is being made between outward appearances and inward feelings. And the ugliest appearance of inward feelings here is in the problem of discrimination.

As for discrimination, most of the media is rephrasing this undeniable discrimination in terms of ‘reputation damage.’ To quote a television news headline, for example, “Evacuees from Fukushima Suffer Scientifically Baseless Reputation Damage.” This definition of reputation damage is a means of shifting the discourse, so as to say, ‘the problem isn’t with the government and TEPCO, who created the problem, but with the guys who are fanning the flames about danger,’ and in the case of individuals and companies which are practicing discrimination, the tacit suggestion is made that “they aren’t discriminating, the problem is with believing wrong information, and if we believe the government, as is correct, discrimination will disappear.” And if one believes the government, there isn’t any need for an evacuation or anything of the kind. In brief, the message is: ‘Stay in Fukushima.’

In my previous essay, “Dystopia of Civil Society, Part 1,” I argued that the strength of Japanese conformism originates not in tradition but the force of discipline in a civil society that has been brought into being by the logic of capital. In the present, a month and a half after 3/11, Fukushima is being positioned in the ‘outside’ of civil society. What is being positioned in the space between it and its outside is not a material wall. It is the wall of ‘primary responsibility for oneself.’ Who can flee when they are told, “Fukushima is perfectly safe, but if you want to flee, go ahead. But we won’t make any guarantees, and we have no idea what will happen to you afterwards?” Can you imagine the true repressive nature of a civil society that states in chorus “Let’s Go! Try harder!” to the people in Fukushima who are struck with anxiety and conflict while at the same time whispering under its breath, trying not to get involved, “but don’t disturb our everyday lives?” If you can’t, you would do well to imagine New York financial brokers gulping down Prozac while staring at the uncontrolled fall in California energy prices on their computers, yelling “Let’s Go!” while deciding, “But also there’s no way our electricity is going to be cut off.”

Still, the disaster has only been going for a month and a half (and what a long month and a half it has been…) It will take at the very shortest a year and at the longest will continue for decades. And it is fully possible that the situation will get worse. The situation is still in the process of unfolding, and while it does not show an accomplished form of control with fixed norms and ideals, but rather a situation that is moving along pragmatically along with changes in the balance of power, the picture drawn of civil society here is of an ugly civil society. But at the same time, a current among farmers, fishermen, and the participants in and sympathizers with the 15,000-person demonstration, which Mouri Takayoshi reports on in this blog, one that takes aim at the ‘real enemy,’ is growing stronger in the media and public opinion. But, Fukushima cannot be saved by this alone. This is where we stand now.

———————————————————

市民社会のディストピア――その2
木下ちがや

カフェンティス/フェデリッチの「蟻塚を再建する必要はあるのか?」は非常に示唆に富むにエッセイであり、そこには日本の現状と未来に向けた指針だけではなく、日本の資本主義と社会の歴史的な関係の問い返しにつながる重要な指摘が含まれている。さっきまで、かれらの指摘に応えるエッセイを書こうと思っていた。しかしいまは、目の前で急速に広がりつつある、日本の市民社会の醜悪な姿ついて、急いで論じなければならない。
4月16日、文部省は子どもの年間放射線許容量を20ミリシーベルトに設定した。これまでの放射線許容量は1ミリシーベルトであり、御用学者が集まる政府の「原子力安全委員会」ですら、10ミリシーベルトが限度と勧告していた。にもかかわらず、一挙に20倍に引き上げたのである。これは要するに、福島県の学校を通常通り開校させることを狙ったもので、事実、グリーンピースの調査によって尋常ではない放射能の数値が出ている地域でも、いまも「平常通り」子ども達は学校に通っている。

先日ある市民団体が行なった調査によると、茨城県、千葉県という、福島県よりも原発から遠い地域の母親の母乳から、微量ながら放射性物質が検出された(この調査をおこなった市民団体に対して、東京都の副知事猪瀬は、「余計な不安を煽るな、主婦はさっさと働け」という暴言を吐いた)。福島県の放射能汚染は日々一刻と深刻化し、放射性物質にもっとも敏感な子ども達の健康は危機的な状況にある。しかしそれに対して、政府も、福島県も、ただ「安全」を唱えるだけで、何も手を打とうとしていない。ただ、これについてはこのブログで池上義彦が論じるだろう。私がここで論じたいのは、この福島県の「外側」の醜悪な市民社会の姿である。

今福島県の「外側」の市民社会では、福島県の人びとに対して一見正反対におもえる二つの反応がある。
ひとつは、「福島頑張れ」というもので、具体的には「風評被害で苦しむ福島の野菜や物品をどんどん買いましょう」というキャンペーンである。福島のものを買おう、食べようということが盛んにいわれている
もうひとつは、福島から県外に避難した人間への、「差別」である。福島県から他の県に転校した子ども達に、嫌がらせやいじめがおきはじめている。福島県のナンバーをつけた車が、ガソリンスタンドの使用拒否や、ホテルへの宿泊拒否などが起こっている。

この二つの反応は、一見正反対のものに見える。前者は「善意」であり、後者は「悪意」であると。しかし現実には、この二つの反応は補い合うかたちで、福島県民を被爆地に「封じ込」め、隔離するという機能を果たしている。そしてこの二つの反応は、「風評被害」という言説で結びついている。

この文脈において、「風評被害」とは、「実際には安全なのに、まるで危険であるかのような噂が流され、結果的に福島県のひとびとが生活やビジネスで、被害を被っている」を意味する。だがいうまでもなく、問題は「原発」にあり、現状は「危険」なのである。ところがそんな「事実」はおかまいなしなのだ。福島原発の危険度がレベル7にあがったとき、TVのコメンテーターはこう言っていた「レベル7にあがったことで、風評が心配です」。このカフカ的不条理ともいえる言説が、いまの日本では、当たり前のようにまかりとおっている。

福島県周辺の農作物、海産物が危険な状態にあることは、もはや当たり前になっている。福島県産の農作物の多くや小魚はすでに出荷停止状態にある。そしてそれは、その土壌の上で生活し、水を使っている福島県の人びとに危険が迫っているということだ。

それにもかかわらず、福島県外の市民たちが、「福島のひとたち、風評被害に負けないで頑張れ、みなさんの生産物は私たちが消費しますよ」というのは、言外に「危険、危険といっているのは嘘だ、福島の人間は、(どんな状況になろうとも)福島の地で、安心して日常を粛々と過ごせ、粛々と働け」といっているのに等しい。ところが実際は、福島県外の市民の多くは、福島県に「危険」が生じていることを察知しているのだ。つまり「建前」と「本音」がここでは使い分けられている。そして「本音」の部分がもっとも醜悪なかたちで現れているのが、「差別」問題である。

この「差別」についていえば、多くのメディアは、この疑いのない「差別」を「風評被害」に言い換えている。たとえばニュース記事の見出しを引用すると『福島からの避難者に、科学的根拠のない風評被害』というものだ。この「風評被害」とは要するに、「原因をつくった政府や東電がわるいのではなく、危険を煽っている奴がわるい」という問題逸らしの言説であって、差別している企業や個人については「差別をしていることではなく、間違った情報を信じていることが悪い、つまりきちんと政府の情報を信じれば、差別はなくなる」ということを暗に示唆している。そして政府の情報を信じるならば、避難などしなくてもいいということになる。つまり「福島にいろ」ということなのだ。

私は先のエッセイ「市民社会のディストピアその1」のなかで、日本のコンフォーミズムの強さは、「伝統」に起因するものではなく、資本の論理が貫徹した市民社会の規律の強さにあると論じた。3・11から一ヶ月を経た現在、福島は、市民社会の「外部」に設定されつつある。「外部」との間に設定されるのは、物理的な「壁」ではない。自己責任という「壁」である。「福島は十分安全です、それでも逃げるのなら、どうぞ。ただしなにも保障しませんし、逃げた先で何があっても知りません」といわれて、誰が逃げられるというのか!そして、不安と葛藤に駆られている福島の人びとに、「頑張ってる!もっと頑張って!」と賞賛しながらも、心の裡では「でも私たちの日常をかき乱さないでね」とささやきながら何も引き受けようとしないこの強迫的市民社会の実像を、あなたは想像できるだろうか?想像したいのなら、プロザックを飲みながらパソコンに向かってカリフォルニアの電力価格の乱高下を眺めながら「頑張れ!」と叫びつつ、「でもウチの電気が止まる訳じゃないしね」と決め込んでいるニューヨークの金融ブローカーでも思い浮かべればいいだろう。

だが、災害はまだはじまって「たった」一ヶ月半しか経過していない(何と長かったことか・・・)。この災害は、短くとも一年、長ければ十年単位で続いていく。そして状況が悪化する可能性は十分にある。事態は進行過程にありで、確固たる規範や理念にもとづいて支配が貫徹しているわけではなく、力学の変化をともないながらプラグマティックに事態がすすんでいるしたがってここで描き出したような市民社会が醜悪な姿をあらわす一方で、少しづつであるが、メディアや世論で、農民、漁師、そしてこのブログで毛利嘉孝が報告しているような一万五千人のデモの参加者やその同調者のなかで、「真の敵」に対峙しようという流れは確実に強まっている。だがそれだけでは、「フクシマ」は救われないのだ。そのような地点にわれわれは、今いるのだ。

3 thoughts on “Dystopia of Civil Society — Part 2”

  1. I came across the SPK (Socialist Patients Collective) website http://www.spkpfh.de and found it quite revealing what Fukushima means when examined from the patients’ viewpoint: The doctor’s class is at work!

    In addition to the worldwide system decay another core melt-down (nuclear power plant Fukushima, Japan, 11/03/2011). / The medical doctors’ declaration of non-objection with respect to any nuclear power plant in advance and long since. / Medically prescribed epidemic of radiation, all over the globe, against all, along with therapy and death inside the radiation shelter clinic.

    I found also very important these texts:
    http://spkpfh.de/The_state_of_the_world_is_illness.htm
    http://spkpfh.de/Against_science.htm
    http://spkpfh.de/Against_Iatrobiontic_warfare.htm#iatrobiontic_warfare

    Illnesses of the world, unite!
    Turn illness into a revolutionary weapon!
    Patients’ class against the medical doctors’ class!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s