The Shock Doctrine of Japanese Type – Neoliberalism and the Shadow of America

(日本語による原文下部に掲載)

The Shock Doctrine of Japanese Type – Neoliberalism and the Shadow of America

Chigaya Kinoshita

Approximately two and a half months have passed since 3/11. Since then we have been discussing politics and society of the present Japan in view of a series of the unprecedented crises: earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident. Meanwhile two demonstrations took place on 4/10 and 5/7, mobilizing more than 15,000 participants, a corresponding upswing of the public opinion against nuclear power forced the most dangerous Hamaoka Nuclear plant into suspension of operation, and the mass literacy concerning nuclear issues has been steadily in improvement. At present the axis of political oppositionality is centered on the nuke issue, which however is defined by the power relations inherent in entire politics and society. In fact Japan’s ruing class is seeking at once to reinforce neoliberal reforms and subordination to the US, as their long-cherished objectives as they have been, by employing the current crises as springboard. The task of the present article is to investigate the strategies of Japan’s ruling class confronting the conjuncture after 3/11, by way of referring back a political process that was initiated in the change of government in 2009. Continue reading

A Direct Appeal

Editor’s note:
“A Direct Appeal” by Committee for De-Nuke Domestic Strike is now deleted from the J-fissures, due to the author’s wish to further develop the grounds for this argument.
July 1, 2011
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編集者より:
脱原発家庭内ストライキ委員会による「駆け込み訴え」は、この論拠についてさらに発展させる余地があるという作者の希望により、本サイトから削除いたします。
2011年7月1日

Save the Children 2 – Were the dead 62 in Chernobyl?

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Save the Children 2 – Were the dead 62 in Chernobyl?

Yoshihiko Ikegami

The late April 26th was the 25th anniversary of Chernobyl nuclear disaster. After 3/11, however, in Japan as well as the world over, the name has come to be recalled as an event provoking a feeling totally distinct from the past. Every single day, we compare the atrocious event of Fukushima with that of Chernobyl, associating the past victims with our own today. Continue reading

Iwaki City, Fukushima: Report from the Stricken Area

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Iwaki City, Fukushima: Report from the Stricken Area
Sacchan
(Translation by Umi Hagitani)

I visited Iwaki City, Fukushima on April 16th. I hadn’t been there since the earthquake. I went there to play a gig. “We don’t want our show to be a part of the Stay Strong Fukushima campaign. We want nuclear power plant to be the theme of the event,” K, who organized the show, said to me. I too was personally irritated that Tokyo doesn’t listen to what Fukushima really has to say. In Iwaki, the coastal area has been devastated by tsunamis, and the northern part, close to the nuclear power plant, is designated as a zone where people are required to take shelter and stay indoor. I wanted to feel and see with my own eyes what folks from this area think about nuclear plant. With these thoughts in mind, I headed to Fukushima. Continue reading

Save the Children!

(日本語による原文下部に掲載)
Save the Children!
Yoshihiko Ikegami

There is a blog <http://nojirimiho.exblog.jp/> which is probably run by someone living in Fukushima. The name in English is something like “Don’t be Negligent! This is a Warzone.” The blog is constantly recording the amount of radiation reported across Fukushima prefecture, and reading the data thoroughly. With little opinion of the blogger, it persists in data analyses: i.e., extrapolating the numbers to annual measure and comparing them with the numbers in other regions. Spectacles and feelings expected from the title “warzone” are totally omitted, while the message “don’t be negligent” flows out from between the lines. Continue reading

Leaving Tokyo

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Leaving Tokyo
Shiro Yabu
(Translation by Max Black)

After the rain I go to a city park with my elementary-school age daughter. She jumps onto the chin-up bar. I notice that it is dripping wet. Lazily swinging back and forth on the bar, she starts to lick the rainwater off the bar. When I scold her, ‘don’t do that!’ she says, ‘but it’s yummy.’ She gets tired of licking the chin-up bar and now she picks a little flower out of the weeds and pretends to suck the nectar out of it. When I say, “I don’t think that kind of flower has nectar in it,’ she says, ‘yes it does.’ She gets tired of picking flowers and now she picks up the twigs around her and starts drawing a line on the ground. She draws train tracks on the ground and pretends to ride the train. The moment I look away, she puts the mud-stained four fingers of her drawing hand in her mouth. I say, ‘that’s dirty,’ but she isn’t listening. She is busy thinking of other ways to play. This one instance is enough to show everything: a girl or girls will pick things up and eat them even if they’ve fallen on the ground and are covered with dust. And the moment that adults look away, they will drop things, pick them up, and put them in their mouth. Continue reading