Notes on the 4.5 Great Kamagasaki Oppression and Nuclear Power Industry

(Original text in Japanese below)

Notes on the 4.5 Great Kamagasaki Oppression and Nuclear Power Industry

Takeshi Haraguchi

On April 5, 2011, Kamagasaki in Osaka suffered the largest case of oppression in recent years. Osaka Prefectural Police arrested 6 activists (and 2 more in the following few days) who were engaged in the struggle in Kamagasaki, and raided at least 14 places around the city.

The occasion of this oppression dates back to 2007. In Kamagasaki, many day laborers, who hop around cheap lodging houses and bunkhouses as well as those who can’t afford these facilities, kept their registration of residency at the addresses of support organizations in and around the neighborhood. However, in 2007, Osaka City abolished residency certificate of all day laborers who were using the addresses of three support organizations such as Kamagasaki Release Center. Day laborers, who often suffer rejection from basic human rights, were now without certificate of residency hence without the right to vote. As a protest against this reckless act by the city, outside a voting station during the House of Representatives election-day in July 2010, supporters of Kamagasaki communities and day laborers themselves took an action to stand against this human rights violation. On April 5th 2011, the City attacked individuals and groups associated with the protest from the previous year, as a preventive oppression to keep them from voicing their demands at then-upcoming general regional election on April 10, 2011.

We ought to take this 4.5 Great Kamagasaki Oppression as an incident that differs from other forms of oppressions against human rights, considering the particular characteristics of Kamagasaki. Since this has a direct link to the situation with nuclear power plants after 3.11. I would like to note crucial points in relating 3.11 and the Kamagasaki incident.

Workers in Yoseba (day laborers’ community) like Kamagasaki in Osaka and Sanya in Tokyo have always been a vital labor power at constructions and various industrial works. Highways, high-rise buildings and dams would not be built without the work force coming from the day laborers’ communities. Who else could have built the site of Osaka World Expo of 1970, for instance?

However, facts of their labors and efforts are hidden in the shadow and forgotten. Away from the eye of the general public, in the places hidden from social consciousness, day laborers have burdened themselves with the works nobody else would want to do. And one of the works they took was no other than the radiation labor at nuclear power plants. In “The Reality of Radiation Workers at Nuclear Power Plants” [original at http://san-ya.at.webry.info/201103/article_11.html], there is a series of testimonies by nuclear plant workers from Sanya in Tokyo. The text records the straight-up voice of a worker who was recruited without much explanations of radiation by his employer, taken to the site with no sense of fear, eventually his body eaten up with diseases, and even lost a friend of his for leukemia. Precisely like Kamagasaki was necessary for the success of the World Expo, day laborers’ sacrifice was necessary in order to maintain the cursed apparatus called nuclear power plant.

And now countless number of workers are brought out for the ever ominous labor at the Fukushima Power Plant. It’s not certain whether the workers are from day laborers’ communities or elsewhere. But the workers at the plant are definitely under, not just similar but, totally the same condition as the typical lives of day laborer’s.

Today’s Kamagasaki workers might be sent to power plants tomorrow, and today’s Fukusima workers might wind up living the lives of Kamagasaki day-workers tomorrow. The oppression on Kamagasaki equals the oppression on all the workers who are at work in nuclear plants and who are going to be sent there in coming days.

One of the targets in the police raid on 4/5 was a space of a documentary film collective. This frankly reveals what the authority fears and attempts to destroy all methods of recording, expressing and conveying the facts.

Here we shall recall the 24th Kamagasaki Riot in June 2008. Since the 1990′s, Kamagasaki has suffered the shrinkage of job market and transformed from “the town of the laborers” into “the town of the unemployed.” During this period, especially after the 23rd riot in 1992, the fire of riots turned into the legend of the past. Therefore the 2008 riot surprised all of those who were involved in Kamagasaki. And most importantly, many young workers joined the insurrection. In response to the 2008 riot, I have written as follows:

The riot of 2008 taught us that the fury of the day-workers – though the majority of whom are now unemployed — has never disappeared. Furthermore, many young people participated in the riot. Which means that they rediscovered the place to express their own fury in Kamagasaki, the sanctuary of riot, that inscribes the history of militant struggle. While the older day-workers and the younger precariats confronted the riot squad together, the method of expressing fury was bequeathed from one generation to another.

The most important lesson from this insurrection is that in the city of Osaka dwelling latently yet certainly is the fury of the oppressed people, which could explode whenever the opportunity comes. The expression of the fury could speak in any possible ways — not only in Kamagasaki but also in any urban space. It is imminent that the whirlpool of rebellion detonates everywhere. (From “Kamagasaki: A Geo-History of Rebellion” by the author)

Documentary films potentially play a crucial role in conveying expressions of anger into various ends. Now the role has become even more important in the aftermath of 3.11, as foundation of anger is widely spreading around the issues of nuclear power. Therefore this role of expression – the film collective – became an immediate target at the 4.5 Great Kamagasaki Oppression — I cannot help but believe so. If this is the case, to record, express, and convey are on the foremost line of the struggles in Kamagasaki as well as against nuclear plants. The 4.5 raid was an oppression not only on day laborers, but also on all of those who create forms of expressions as messengers of struggle.

[supplements]

Kamagasaki is a small section of town in Osaka in which approximately 20,000 to 30,000 day laborers live. When the town had the largest population, well over 200 cheap lodging houses stood side by side, in which many day laborers lived. Such day laborers’ communities exist in every larger city such as Sanya in Tokyo, Kotobukicho in Yokohama, and Sasajima in Nagoya, and they are typically called Yoseba (laborer’s community).

Yoseba did not come into existence spontanieously, but they were a product of capital and the nation-state, for their own necessities. In order to successfully construct the site of 1970 World Expo in Osaka, the Japanese government reportedly hired a large number of young workers from all over Japan to work at construction sites. To ensure as many useful and cheap work forces as possible, the government turned Kamagasaki into a concentrated day laborers ghetto in the late ’60s. Since then Kamagasaki has been used by capital as a main site of labor power for the lowest paying jobs like construction and other industries. Then the capital has also left many to live on and die on the street.

Yoseba has always been a stage to voice our demands to the nation-state and capital, as well as a base for resistance. The most important action of Kamagasaki resistance has been insurrection. August 1st in 1961, following a car incident that killed a day laborer whose body was left on the street without proper attention of the local police, the first Kamagasaki riot began. There have been 24 major riots there since.

—————————————————

4・5釜ヶ崎大弾圧と原発を考えるための覚え書き

原口剛

2011年4月5日、近年例を見ない規模の大弾圧が、大阪の釜ヶ崎で起きた。大阪府警は釜ヶ崎にかかわる5名を一斉に逮捕し、少なくとも14ヶ所へのガサ入れを行なったのだ(後日、さらに2名が逮捕された)。
この弾圧の文脈は、2007年にさかのぼる。釜ヶ崎では、簡易宿所(ドヤ)や飯場を転々とする日雇労働者や、それにすら泊まるお金のない野宿生活者が、支援団体の施設などに住民票を置いていた。ところが大阪市は釜ヶ崎解放会館など3つの建物に置いていた日雇労働者の住民票を、2007年にいっせいに消除した。ただでさえ基本的権利から排除された日雇労働者や野宿生活者は、さらに住民票を失うことによって、選挙権の行使という権利すらも奪われることになった。この暴挙に抗議すべく、昨年2010年7月の衆議院選挙投票日には、釜ヶ崎地域内の投票所で人権侵害を訴える行動が取り組まれた。2011年4月5日、大阪府警は4月10日の地方選挙において抗議の声があがることをあらかじめ封殺するために、この抗議行動への参加者を弾圧したのである。
この4・5釜ヶ崎大弾圧を、釜ヶ崎という特殊な地域の出来事として、切り離して考えてはならない。それは、3・11以降の原発をめぐる日本の状況に直結するものとして考えられなければならない。ここでは、3・11以降の状況と4・5釜ヶ崎大弾圧を結びつけて考えるために欠かせないと思われる点を、書き記しておきたい。

1.
釜ヶ崎や山谷といった寄せ場の日雇労働者は、建設業をはじめとする産業労働にとって、欠くことのできない労働力であった。高速道路、高層ビル、ダムといったさまざまな建設物は、寄せ場の日雇労働者の手によってこそ建設された。釜ヶ崎に日雇労働者がいなければ、いったい誰が1970年の万国博覧会の会場を建設できただろうか?
しかし、日雇労働者がそのような労働を担ったという事実は、人びとに知られないまま忘れられていく。人びとの知らぬところで、人びとの意識にものぼらぬところで、寄せ場の日雇労働者や野宿生活者は、誰も携わりたくないような、もっとも危険で苛酷な労働を担わされてきた。そして彼らが担わされた労働のひとつが、ほかならぬ原発被爆労働だった。『野宿労働者の原発被曝労働の実態』http://san-ya.at.webry.info/201103/article_11.htmlには、東京・山谷の労働者の原発被爆労働実態の証言が記録されている。ここには、ろくな説明もないまま、わけもわからぬまま原発被爆労働に送り込まれ、身体を蝕まれ、仲間を失った労働者の生の声が綴られている。万国博覧会を開催するのに釜ヶ崎が必要不可欠であったのと同じように、原発という呪われた装置を維持するためには、寄せ場の労働者が、彼らの犠牲がどうしても必要だったのだ。
そしていま、数多くの労働者がこの禍々しい労働に送り出されている。彼らが寄せ場から送り出されたのか、別のところから送り出されたのかはわからない。けれども確かにいえることは、いま原発被爆労働を強いられている労働者と、寄せ場の日雇労働者は、似たような、ではなく、まったく同じ存在だということだ。釜ヶ崎の日雇労働者はあしたには原発労働に送り出されるかもしれず、原発に送り出されている労働者はあしたには釜ヶ崎に住むかもしれない。釜ヶ崎に対する弾圧は、いま原発被爆労働を強いられている、あるいはこれから強いられようとしている、すべての労働者を弾圧するのに等しい行為である。

2.
4・5釜ヶ崎大弾圧の標的のひとつとなったのは、ドキュメンタリー・スペースであった。これは、権力がなにを恐れ、潰そうとしているのかを、端的に示している。それは、記録すること、表現すること、伝えることなのだ。
ここで思い起こされるのは、2008年6月に勃発した第24次暴動である。1990年代以降、釜ヶ崎の労働市場は縮小を続け、釜ヶ崎は「労働者のまち」から「失業者のまち」へと変貌させられた。このなかで暴動の炎は、1992年の第23次暴動を最後に、もはや過去の伝説と化していたのだった。それゆえこの暴動は、釜ヶ崎にかかわるすべての人々を驚嘆させた。そしてなにより重要なことに、この暴動には多数の若者が参加していた。
この2008年暴動について、2009年の文章のなかで私はつぎのように書いた。「若者は、長年の闘争が刻み込まれた釜ヶ崎にこそ、自身の怒りを表明する場を見出したのだ。かつての日雇労働者と現代のプレカリアートが、ともに機動隊に対峙する姿は、まるで先輩が後輩に怒りの表現方法を伝授しているかのようであった。08年釜ヶ崎暴動が伝えるもっとも重要な教訓は、都市大阪には、抑圧された民衆の憤りが潜在的に、しかし確実にうごめいているということ、そして機会と場所さえ与えられれば、それはさまざまなかたちをとって爆発しうるということ、である。このとき怒りの表現は、釜ヶ崎のみならず、都市空間のあらゆるところで、予測不可能なかたちで爆発しうるだろう」。
おそらくドキュメンタリーは、怒りの表現方法を伝達し、さまざまな場所に伝播させるうえで、カギとなる役割を担っている。3・11以降の現在、原発をめぐって怒りの素地があまねく広がっている状況において、その役割はなおさら重大である。だからこそ、4・5釜ヶ崎大弾圧において、それはまっさきに弾圧の標的になった。私にはそう思えてならない。だとすれば、記録すること、表現すること、伝達することは、釜ヶ崎大弾圧そして原発に対する闘争の、おそらくは最前線に位置している。4・5釜ヶ崎大弾圧は、日雇労働者に対する弾圧であると同時に、記録や表現に携わるあらゆる者に対する弾圧でもあるのだ。

(補足)
1.釜ヶ崎とは、その数2万人とも3万人ともいわれる日雇労働者が住む地域である。釜ヶ崎には最大の時期には200軒以上の安価な宿(ドヤ)が並び立っており、日雇労働者はドヤを住みかとして生活してきた。このような場所は、東京の山谷、横浜の寿町、名古屋の笹島など、大都市には必ず存在しており、それらは総称して「寄せ場」と呼ばれている。
2.寄せ場は、決して自然発生的に生まれたのではない。それは、資本や国家が自身の必要のために生み出した産物なのである。1970年の大阪万博を成功させるために、政府は関連する建設工事に従事する若い単身労働者を全国からかき集めようとした。そして、使い勝手の良い安価な労働力を大量に確保するために、1960年代後半に釜ヶ崎を日雇労働者のまちへと塗り替えた。こうして釜ヶ崎は、建設業をはじめとする諸産業の最下層部に日雇労働力を供給する地域として、資本によって活用されつづけてきた――そして彼ら日雇労働者を使い捨て、野宿生活へと、路上での死へと追いやってきた。
3.寄せ場は、国家や資本に対し声をあげるための舞台であり、抵抗を繰り広げるための拠点であった。そのもっとも重要な実践は、暴動である。1961年8月1日、車に轢かれた日雇労働者を警察が長時間放置したことをきっかけとして、釜ヶ崎の第一次暴動が発生した。以後、釜ヶ崎では大規模なものだけでも計24回の暴動が起こりつづけてきた。

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s